Planting time

Those great big gourds grown over last summer are almost all dry now with the seeds rattling around inside. So that was four months of drying time. Soon I will clean them up and then decide what to do with them!

Gourds need a really long growing season to build up a nice thick shell. Ideally, your plants can go out into the ground now, but Its not too late to plant gourd seeds for the summer. I’ve just put 12 seeds into water to soak for a day. Tomorrow I will put them between damp paper-towels in the hot water cupboard to hasten the sprouting.

Harvest time

Finally the first frosts hit Whanganui and those massive gourds were picked and put aside for drying. I’m guessing it will take 6 or more months for them to dry out completely, and then they will be ready to make into interesting containers. Last years gourds are waiting for transformation into things of usefulness or beauty…or both. We are planning workshops at Whanganui Regional Museum to create lanterns and musical instruments.

 

Autumn harvest is drawing near

Where did those last 6 months go? Its been a long hot dry summer here in Whanganui. Anyone who has managed to get a good crop of gourds has done well. We’ve got a few beauties waiting to be picked. The vines are still growing and flowering, because the summery weather has stretched out into May. These gourds are massive, so they will take months to dry when the time comes to pick them.

3 gourdsgourd 1

Late Frost

It was a freezing cold morning here in Whanganui today, with frost in sheltered places. Not good weather for a gourd plant to be outside in, but a lovely sunny day will follow.  If you have already planted your seedlings out into the garden, check to see if they survived that cold snap. There won’t be much plant growth going on just yet. Gourds like the temperature to be around 20 degrees, and then they will shoot away.

Frost has its uses. It kills off the little pests waiting to attack your garden.

Seed-planting time

It’s been a cold Spring here in Whanganui, but the frosts are well and truly over. it’s not too late to plant a crop of gourd seeds or the summer. In fact, the seeds like a bit more warmth to germinate, so they sprout much better if you can start them off in a warm spot, such as a greenhouse. The hot-water cupboard will do just to get germination underway, but you need to get the shoots into soil and out into the sunshine.

Gourd seeds are available at Whanganui Regional Museum. Just call in any day between 10.00am and 4.30 pm. You can pick up a packet for just $2. If you are further away, you can email info@wrm.org.nz and ask for some to be sent to you.

Spring Arrives

September 1 this week marked the calendar beginning of Spring, and the slight warming of the air is encouraging lots of plants to start their spring growth. It’s time to get those hue/gourd seeds growing! It won’t be warm enough for gourd plants to be out in the garden until October, when all the danger of frost is past, but the seeds can be soaked overnight and then sprouted inside before then.

gourd shoots

The best sprouting place is a warm hot-water cupboard in a container with damp paper towels. just make sure the towels don’t dry out. Your seeds will have little shoots popping out within a few days. As soon as they sprout, get them into some nice clean damp seed-raising mix; one seed per partition (eg in a six-part cell-pack).

sprouting gourds

Within a week, the first two seed-leaves will appear. At this stage, the seedlings need protection from slugs and snails. They need warmth, light and moisture. Too much water will make the stalks rot. Keep them growing inside like this until the true leaves have appeared.Plant out in the garden when the seedling has about 4-6 true leaves

If it’s still too cold where you live, transplant your hue / gourd into a big pot and keep it in a sheltered place.

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In the Grip of Winter

Another frost blankets the ground in Whanganui this morning. By now, all the gourds grown over the last season should be harvested and stored in an airy place, where they can gradually turn from green to brown and dry. Sunshine will help the moisture inside each gourd to evaporate.

dead vines

Dead vines with ripe gourds

ripe fruit and dead vines

Ripe gourds ready to pick

Because drying gourds are exuding moisture, they can develop thick moulds. These can be wiped off with bleach or with methylated spirits, or the mould can be left to grow. It will form interesting patterns on the surface of the gourd that can be enhanced and polished when the gourd is fully dried.

first cleaned gourd of 2015

Cleaned gourd

Now is the time to pull out the dried gourd vines from the garden and compost them. Clear away any weeds, add manure or compost to the ground to replenish nutrients used over the growing season, then cover the bare earth with a thick layer of mulch to prevent any weeds growing. This will ensure your garden is ready to replant in spring.